2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • THE KILLERS
  • 2:40 6:20 10:00
  • CRISS CROSS
  • 1:00 4:40 8:20

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesUNIVERSAL 100

See the complete schedule of films

THE KILLERS & CRISS CROSS

SIODMAKTHE KILLERS 

(1946) “Don’t ask a dying man to send his soul to hell!” Gas jockey/boxer Burt Lancaster (in his debut) holes up in a small dark room awaiting his own assassins — as insurance dick Edmond O’Brien unearths the whole sordid tale, including dirt on two-timing Ava Gardner. Approx. 105 min. 35mm.
2:40, 6:20, 10:00

 

"Luxuriantly bleak. The Killers confirmed the visual primacy of Siodmak’s style (particularly as realized by the cinematographer Elwood Bredell, who shot both Christmas Holiday and Phantom Lady) while revealing a new harshness of tone."
– J. Hoberman, The New York Times

“A prime example of post-war pessimism and fatalism.”
Time Out (London)

THE KILLERS & CRISS CROSS

CRISS CROSS

(1949) “I shoulda been a better friend. I shoulda stopped you. I shoulda grabbed you by the neck. I shoulda kicked your teeth in.” When honest armored car guard Burt Lancaster is caught with Yvonne De Carlo by new hubby Dan Duryea, his only choice is to go through with his explanation: to hold up his own truck. Approx. 87 min. 35mm.
1:00, 4:40, 8:20

 

“Siodmak’s talent for brooding violence and the somber urban setting 
gives the film a relentlessly mounting tension.”

– Peter John Dyer

“Stands atop Siodmak’s Hollywood career.Virtually a remake of the Lancaster parts of The Killers, it manages to improve on it, with even Yvonne De Carlo's vamp living up to the precedent set by the divine Ava. The flashback structure is even more strange and unsettling here, losing us in a narrative maze, the only certainty being the folly of the hero's actions. The tragic ending is perhaps the most devastating in all Noir.”
– David Cairns, Moving Image Source

“A flashy, feverish tale of betrayal.” – Dennis Lim, The New York Times

“Siodmak’s exemplary Film Noir tells an emotionally tangled story by means of an unusually knotty narrative tangle.”
– Richard Brody, The New Yorker
Click here to see Brody’s video essay on the film

“From the opening aerial shot across the darkened city and into the parking lot of a small nightclub,
Criss Cross invokes the indicators of Noir fatality... one of the most tragic and compelling of Film Noir.”

– Alain Silver